What is cradle cap and how do I treat it?

  • by Petra Jelinkova
What is cradle cap and how do I treat it?

The very first skin condition I had to contend with in my early days as a new mum was cradle cap. It took over my little boy’s scalp with its crusty and yellow flakes. The first thing I wanted to do was to remove it and bring back his beautiful, smooth skin. What is cradle cap? Cradle cap is a skin condition that most commonly affects babies under three months. It is a form of dermatitis which causes the oil glands in the skin to become inflamed. This inflammation causes the thick, yellow crusts. It stops after the baby is about three months old because the oil glands become inactive until puberty. If your baby has signs of cradle cap after three months, it could be eczema, and you should seek a healthcare professional's diagnosis and treatment.

 

What does cradle cap look like? It can look like:

  • flaky skin
  • red, inflamed skin
  • yellow crusts
  • greasy skin

How do we treat it?

It will usually go away by itself, but many parents choose to treat cradle cap because it doesn’t look or feel nice on a baby’s scalp. Here are some steps to help improve cradle cap:

  • Massage oil into the scalp at night; our itchy baby co. natural scalp oil has oat extract and coconut. These two natural ingredients have soothing properties which aid in preventing flakiness on the scalp skin.
  • The next morning, make a mixture of our itchy baby co. natural bath soak by mixing two spoonful of oatmeal bath soak powder with lukewarm water (enough for baby baths) and use this to cleanse the scalp. Then gently use a soft-bristled toothbrush to lift the flakes and crusts.
  • Continue this process until the scalp is clear and start this process again if the cradle cap reappears. If your baby’s cradle cap still isn’t improving, you should see your healthcare professional.

 

Can it become infected?

Like other conditions which affect our skin, cradle cap can become infected. If your baby’s scalp becomes more red, and the skin looks like it’s weeping or blistering, it’s important to see your doctor. This infection will most likely need to be treated with antibiotics.

This blog post was brought to you and your baby with love by Julia and the Itchy Baby Co. team. x

 

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.


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